Part-time Writer, Part-time Student, Full-time Fan.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from thewritingcafe  2,229 notes

Free Mythology Books for Kindle!

jumbledmystic:

Can’t speak for the quality of these books, but I figure that free books are free books and they are worth the read for anyone with an interest in mythology!

Note: All of these books are free as of this writing and most are public domain, but always double check the price before clicking to purchase.

  1. The Children of Odin The Book of Northern Myths
  2. Asgard Stories Tales from Norse Mythology
  3. Myths & Legends of the Celtic Race
  4. Viking Tales
  5. Myths and Folk Tales of Ireland
  6. Hero-Myths & Legends of the British Race
  7. Aw-Aw-Tam Indian Nights Being the myths and legends of the Pimas of Arizona
  8. Myths and Legends of the Sioux
  9. Myths and Legends of the Great Plains
  10. Myths and Legends of California and the Old Southwest
  11. American Hero-Myths: A Study in the Native Religions of the Western Continent
  12. Nights With Uncle Remus: Myths and Legends of the Old Plantation
  13. Myths of Babylonia and Assyria
  14. Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome
  15. Myths and Legends of China
  16. Curious Myths of the Middle Ages
  17. Bible Myths and their Parallels in other Religions: Being a Comparison of the Old and New Testament Myths and Miracles with those of the Heathen Nations … Considering also their Origin and Meaning
  18. Myths and Legends of All Nations: Famous Stories from the Greek, German, English, Spanish, Scandinavian, Danish, French, Russian, Bohemian, Italian and other sources
  19. A Book of Myths
  20. Myths That Every Child Should Know: A Selection Of The Classic Myths Of All Times For Young
  21. Famous Tales of Fact and Fancy: Myths and Legends of the Nations of the World Retold for Boys and Girls

EDIT: And for those of you that do not have a Kindle — THERE IS AN APP for that! You can get the Kindle app for ipod/iphone etc here, you can also get the program for PC here, and finally the one for Mac over here!

Reblogged from clevergirlhelps  5,625 notes

WRITING REFERENCE

moriarty-has-the-impala:

Okay, you know how hard it is to make those side characters in your writing? There is a website that allows you to create different random identities for all types of characters.

This website literally generates an identity for a fictitious person and makes up the full name of the person, address, maiden name, birthday, blood type, weight, height… and they give it personality - favorite color, website, vehicle, job/occupation, company…

This site is literally amazing if you want to create a random character but you don’t know what to name him/her or you don’t know how to portray them.

You just enter the gender, name set, and the country and hit generate. That’s it. (And yes, you can have Hobbit, Klingon, and Ninja names.)

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Here are a few examples:

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okay, I hope this helps someone! :) I know it helped me…

Reblogged from clevergirlhelps  3,082 notes

Numbers, Symbols and Colors

shackleboltrps:

Yesterday, I shared a list of links to help you guys pick a name that is meaningful to your character. Today, I’d like to share another set of links (as always) that focuses on meanings, mainly the meanings behind numbers, symbols and colors. 

Why? Why am I so keen on finding things that have a deeper meaning to them? Because of Harry Potter. If you think about it, everything in the book has a purpose and a meaning. J.K Rowling picked specific names and numbers to perfectly mesh with her books. Everything has a place and a reason. I think this is something that admins can use in their role plays if they wish to spend time thinking about the specifics of their story. Admins can even go as far as to think about if their color scheme fits the atmosphere of their story.

Here are a few links to help you with that.

On numbers

On symbols 

On colors

Reblogged from starksbucks  12,256 notes
andlionheart:

shiver | (listen) (download)those indescribable sounds - a mix of songs that send shivers up your spine;  




i. youth - daughter | ii. comes and goes - greg laswell | iii. bible belt - dry the river | iv. blood bank - bon iver | v. boats and birds - gregory and the hawk | vi. the enemy - mumford & sons | vii. plains - wye oak | viii. to build a home - the cinematic orchestra | ix. young blood (renholder remix) - the naked and famous | x. ride - cary brothers | xi. demons - dry the river | xii. parachutes - coldplay | xiii. fish - wye oak | xiv. winter bones - stars | xv. dust on the ground - bombay bicycle club | xvi. andvari - sigur rós | xvii. flaws (recorded at abbey road) - bastille | xviii. misguided ghosts - paramore | xix. letters from the sky - civil twilight | xx. bloodstream - stateless | xxi. running up that hill - placebo | xxii. inscape - stateless | xxiii. flickers - son lux

andlionheart:

shiver | (listen) (download)
those indescribable sounds - a mix of songs that send shivers up your spine;  

i. youth - daughter | ii. comes and goes - greg laswell | iii. bible belt - dry the river | iv. blood bank - bon iver | v. boats and birds - gregory and the hawk | vi. the enemy - mumford & sons | vii. plains - wye oak | viii. to build a home - the cinematic orchestra | ix. young blood (renholder remix) - the naked and famous | x. ride - cary brothers | xi. demons - dry the river | xii. parachutes - coldplay | xiii. fish - wye oak | xiv. winter bones - stars | xv. dust on the ground - bombay bicycle club | xvi. andvari - sigur rós | xvii. flaws (recorded at abbey road) - bastille | xviii. misguided ghosts - paramore | xix. letters from the sky - civil twilight | xx. bloodstream - stateless | xxi. running up that hill - placebo | xxii. inscape - stateless | xxiii. flickers - son lux

Reblogged from thewritingcafe  7,539 notes
gaelickitsune:

HeyO! This was a bit of something I’ve wanted to do for awhile. Had it in my mind to do an Irish/Celtic/Gaelic/Welsh/Scottishwhathaveyou guide for awhile. Finally got around to it, at the very tail end of summer. So here goes.
Aos Sí: Irish term meaning “people of the mound”, they’re comparatively your faeries and elves of Irish mythology. Some believe they are the living survivors of the Tuatha Dé Danann. They’re fiercely territorial of their little mound homes and can either be really, really pretty or really, really ugly. They’re often referred to not by name, but as “Fair Folk” or “Good Neighbors”. Never, ever piss them off.
Cat Sidhe: Cat Sidhe are faerie cats, often black with white spots on their chests. They haunted Scotland, but a few Irish tales tell of witches who could turn into these cats a total of nine times (nine lives?). The Cat Sidhe were large as dogs and were believed to be able to steal souls by passing over a dead body before burial. Irusan was a cat sidhe the size of an ox, and once took a satirical poet for a wild ride before Saint Ciaran killed it with a hot poker.
Badb: Part of the trio of war goddesses called Morrígna with sisters Macha and Morrígan, Badb, meaning “crow”, was responsible for cleaning bodies up after battle. Her appearance meant imminent bloodshed, death of an important person, and/or mass confusion in soldiers that she would use to turn victories in her favor. She and her sisters fought the Battles of Mag Tuired, driving away the Fir Bolg army and the Formorians. In short: total badass.
Merrow: The Irish mermaid. They were said to be very benevolent, charming, modest and affectionate, capable of attachment and companionship with humans. It is believed that they wore caps or capes that would allow them to live underwater, and taking a cap/cape of a merrow would render them unable to return to the sea. Merrow, unlike regular mermaids, were also capable of “shedding” their skin to become more beautiful beings. They also like to sing.
Púca: Also called a phooka, these are the chaotic neutral creatures of the Irish mythos world. They were known to rot fruit and also offer great advice. They are primarily shapeshifters, taking a variety of forms both scary as heck and really really pretty. The forms they took are always said to be dark in color. Púcas are partial to equine forms and have known to entice riders onto its back for a wild but friendly romp, unlike the Kelpie, which just eats its riders after drowning them.
Faoladh: My all-time favorite Irish creature. Faoladh are Irish werewolves. Unlike their english neighbors, Faoladh weren’t seen as cursed and could change into wolves at will. Faoladh of Ossory (Kilkenny) were known to operate in male/female pairs and would spend several years in wolf form before returning to human life together, replaced in work by a younger couple. They are the guardians and protectors of children, wounded men, and lost people. They weren’t above killing sheep or cattle while in wolf form for a meal, and the evidence remained quite plainly on them in human form. Later on, the story of an Irish King being cursed by God made the Faoladh a little less reputable.
Dullahan: Dullahan are headless riders, often carrying their decapitated cranium beneath one arm. They are said to have wild eyes and a grin that goes from ear to ear, and they use the spine of a human skeleton as a whip (What the WHAT). Their carriages were made of dismembered body parts and general darkness. Where they stop riding is where a person is doomed to die, and when they say the human’s name, that person dies instantly.
Gancanagh: An Irish male faerie known as the “Love-Talker”. He’s a dirty little devil related to the Leprechaun that likes seducing human women. Apparently the sex was great, but ultimately the woman would fall into some sort of ruin, whether it be financial or scandal or generally having their lives turn out awful. He was always carrying a dudeen—Irish pipe—and was a pretty chill guy personality-wise. You just don’t ever want to meet him—it’s really bad luck. 

gaelickitsune:

HeyO! This was a bit of something I’ve wanted to do for awhile. Had it in my mind to do an Irish/Celtic/Gaelic/Welsh/Scottishwhathaveyou guide for awhile. Finally got around to it, at the very tail end of summer. So here goes.

Aos Sí: Irish term meaning “people of the mound”, they’re comparatively your faeries and elves of Irish mythology. Some believe they are the living survivors of the Tuatha Dé Danann. They’re fiercely territorial of their little mound homes and can either be really, really pretty or really, really ugly. They’re often referred to not by name, but as “Fair Folk” or “Good Neighbors”. Never, ever piss them off.

Cat Sidhe: Cat Sidhe are faerie cats, often black with white spots on their chests. They haunted Scotland, but a few Irish tales tell of witches who could turn into these cats a total of nine times (nine lives?). The Cat Sidhe were large as dogs and were believed to be able to steal souls by passing over a dead body before burial. Irusan was a cat sidhe the size of an ox, and once took a satirical poet for a wild ride before Saint Ciaran killed it with a hot poker.

Badb: Part of the trio of war goddesses called Morrígna with sisters Macha and Morrígan, Badb, meaning “crow”, was responsible for cleaning bodies up after battle. Her appearance meant imminent bloodshed, death of an important person, and/or mass confusion in soldiers that she would use to turn victories in her favor. She and her sisters fought the Battles of Mag Tuired, driving away the Fir Bolg army and the Formorians. In short: total badass.

Merrow: The Irish mermaid. They were said to be very benevolent, charming, modest and affectionate, capable of attachment and companionship with humans. It is believed that they wore caps or capes that would allow them to live underwater, and taking a cap/cape of a merrow would render them unable to return to the sea. Merrow, unlike regular mermaids, were also capable of “shedding” their skin to become more beautiful beings. They also like to sing.

Púca: Also called a phooka, these are the chaotic neutral creatures of the Irish mythos world. They were known to rot fruit and also offer great advice. They are primarily shapeshifters, taking a variety of forms both scary as heck and really really pretty. The forms they took are always said to be dark in color. Púcas are partial to equine forms and have known to entice riders onto its back for a wild but friendly romp, unlike the Kelpie, which just eats its riders after drowning them.

Faoladh: My all-time favorite Irish creature. Faoladh are Irish werewolves. Unlike their english neighbors, Faoladh weren’t seen as cursed and could change into wolves at will. Faoladh of Ossory (Kilkenny) were known to operate in male/female pairs and would spend several years in wolf form before returning to human life together, replaced in work by a younger couple. They are the guardians and protectors of children, wounded men, and lost people. They weren’t above killing sheep or cattle while in wolf form for a meal, and the evidence remained quite plainly on them in human form. Later on, the story of an Irish King being cursed by God made the Faoladh a little less reputable.

Dullahan: Dullahan are headless riders, often carrying their decapitated cranium beneath one arm. They are said to have wild eyes and a grin that goes from ear to ear, and they use the spine of a human skeleton as a whip (What the WHAT). Their carriages were made of dismembered body parts and general darkness. Where they stop riding is where a person is doomed to die, and when they say the human’s name, that person dies instantly.

Gancanagh: An Irish male faerie known as the “Love-Talker”. He’s a dirty little devil related to the Leprechaun that likes seducing human women. Apparently the sex was great, but ultimately the woman would fall into some sort of ruin, whether it be financial or scandal or generally having their lives turn out awful. He was always carrying a dudeen—Irish pipe—and was a pretty chill guy personality-wise. You just don’t ever want to meet him—it’s really bad luck. 

Reblogged from clevergirlhelps  5,536 notes
clevergirlhelps:

tonkinrpa:


Guide To Torturing Someone

Below the cut is a guide to the art of torture for anyone playing a character who needs or wants to torture another, or anyone who’s simply interested. I, in no way, condone the replication of anything in this post in real life. This is exclusively for writing purposes. Do not try at home. 

Triggers: Violence

Read More

Updated link

clevergirlhelps:

tonkinrpa:

Guide To Torturing Someone

Below the cut is a guide to the art of torture for anyone playing a character who needs or wants to torture another, or anyone who’s simply interested. I, in no way, condone the replication of anything in this post in real life. This is exclusively for writing purposes. Do not try at home. 

Triggers: Violence

Read More

Updated link