Part-time Writer, Part-time Student, Full-time Fan.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from the-fandoms-are-cool  850 notes
the-fandoms-are-cool:

montyfiske:

don’t need another half to make me whole / a mix for all my my fellow aromantic asexual people out there (listen)

Heart Heavy Mother Mother ○ Take A Hint Victoria Justice & Liz Gillies ○ We Don’t Want Your Body Stars ○ Never Fall In Love Emilie Simon ○ Daria Cake ○ Hello Martin Solveig ft. Dragonette ○ Don’t Wanna Fall In Love Green Day ○ Say Anything (Else) Cartel ○ I Won’t Be Crying Infernal ○ What Were You Expecting Halestorm

the-fandoms-are-cool:

montyfiske:

don’t need another half to make me whole / a mix for all my my fellow aromantic asexual people out there (listen)

Heart Heavy Mother Mother ○ Take A Hint Victoria Justice & Liz Gillies ○ We Don’t Want Your Body Stars ○ Never Fall In Love Emilie Simon ○ Daria Cake ○ Hello Martin Solveig ft. Dragonette ○ Don’t Wanna Fall In Love Green Day ○ Say Anything (Else) Cartel ○ I Won’t Be Crying Infernal ○ What Were You Expecting Halestorm

Reblogged from maxkirin  1,330 notes

maxkirin:

[WRITING & FIGHTING!] is a mix for writers looking to jump right into the heat of battle! This mix contains 14 of my favorite tracks for writing combat, action scenes, and the awesome final battle. If you’re looking for an intense writing playlist, and you are a fan of heavy percussion, then you’ve found come to the right place! Get ready, because it’s time to FIGHT!

♪ Listen to this mix on 8tracks ♪

Looking for more writing playlists? Check out my other mixes:

Oh, and if you want more writerly content, then follow my blog for your daily dose of prompts, advice, and writer positivity: maxkirin.tumblr.com!

Reblogged from clevergirlhelps  771 notes
dominicwrites:

POWERLISTING, a series of posts to help you decide what superpower is right for your character, or simply just to give you ideas of what you want in case your mind is blank (with links included for a more in-depth approach).

A E R O K I N E S I S(EHR-oh-kuh-knee-sis)
Definition: The ability to control/manipulate air (i.e. winds, air pockets, wind tunnels, etc.)

Read More

dominicwrites:

POWERLISTING, a series of posts to help you decide what superpower is right for your character, or simply just to give you ideas of what you want in case your mind is blank (with links included for a more in-depth approach).

A E R O K I N E S I S
(EHR-oh-kuh-knee-sis)

Definition: The ability to control/manipulate air (i.e. winds, air pockets, wind tunnels, etc.)

Read More

Reblogged from bibliophylum  1,081 notes

The best thing about writing fiction is that moment where the story catches fire and comes to life on the page, and suddenly it all makes sense and you know what it’s about and why you’re doing it and what these people are saying and doing, and you get to feel like both the creator and the audience. Everything is suddenly both obvious and surprising… and it’s magic and wonderful and strange. By Neil Gaiman (via bibliophylum)

Reblogged from its-a-writer-thing  1,603 notes

General Writing Tips

stephaniegrand:

These techniques will work on any kind of fiction: literary, romance, mystery, sci-fi, etc. What’s more, you can implement them no matter where you are in your writing process, from first draft to final polish.

1. Go beyond the five senses.

Agents and editors love the five senses, but they want and expect more. They want physical business that deepens not just your setting, but your characterizations.

Here’s the key: The best authors use body language in their narratives. When it’s missing, fiction feels flat.

Begin by reading up on body language. You’ll find that two things are at the root of all of it: anxiety (or lack thereof) and hidden desires. Dwell inside your characters and sense how they feel in any given situation.

2. Embrace idiosyncrasies.

People behave rationally only part of the time; the rest of the time we take stupid risks and do other things we can’t explain. Agents and editors know this as well as anyone, but because they don’t want readers to have to work too hard to suspend disbelief, they really harp on believability. And when they do, frequently their objections have to do with a character’s motivation. The trouble is, if you bow to this and have your characters behave totally rationally at all times, you’ll write dead-boring fiction.

Human weirdness follows patterns we can all relate to (or at least understand). If you incorporate a strong enough motivating factor—even an irrational one—you can easily establish a plausible reason for erratic actions on the part of your characters. And those characters are far more interesting to read about than those who always behave rationally.

3. Forget about being pretty.

Not-pretty has two meanings here: a) topics that are not attractive, like racism or incest, and b) the way you write.

Agents and editors can’t stand authors who put restraints on their work for the sake of delicacy. Most people shy away from darkness, but as an author you must be willing to dwell there, see it truly, explore it before you represent it. Banish all restraints when you write, regardless of the topic. Free your writing.

4. Be true to your IQ.

Aspiring authors sometimes dumb down their work because they’re afraid of alienating the vast masses of potential customers they imagine they should be writing for. This is disastrous. You cannot do it. And you don’t need to—the average Joes and Janes are smarter than you may think.

Don’t underestimate your readers. If they like to read the sorts of books you like to write, they’re right up there with your core demographic. And dumbing down your work can be doubly disastrous, because if you do, agents and editors will not be able to relate to it.

5. Use your best material only when it has a purpose.

Agents and editors have a sixth sense when it comes to kitchen-sink novels: novels that contain a fictionalized version of every cool, unusual or amazing thing that ever happened to the author.

Do not put scenes in your story that do not further the plot in any way. While incidents that occurred in your life might be colorful, they often carry no weight in a novel. An isolated cool-yet-irrelevant scene suggests an author’s immaturity as an artist, and will be noted by agents and editors.

Here’s the key: Put your best material in, but leave the kitchen sink in the kitchen. When tempted to throw in something awesome that the story doesn’t really demand, go ahead and write it, but during revisions take it out and save it. Alternatively, adapt your story to the cool thing.

Reblogged from as-seenon-tv  133,265 notes